Past GLOBAL Conferences

The IAFOR International Conference on Global Studies (GLOBAL) is an exciting addition to our conference calendar. It places the international, intercultural and interdisciplinary tenets of The International Academic Forum (IAFOR) at the very heart of multiple academic approaches to Global Studies.

The IAFOR International Conference on Global Studies brings together delegates from many different national, cultural and linguistic backgrounds to Barcelona, Spain, to present new research and exchange ideas. This exceptional platform welcomes speakers and delegates for challenging debate and stimulating discussions around the latest concepts and newest approaches.

IAFOR's conferences are encouraging and nurturing environments where ideas can be shared and tested, where research synergies and collaborations can be formed, and where some of the biggest names in the field have the opportunity to interact with up-and-coming faculty members.

IAFOR’s cultural and area studies conferences are organised in partnership with universities such as Monash University in Australia; the University of Barcelona, Spain; Moscow State University in Russia; Birkbeck, University of London; Lehigh University and Northwestern, USA; University of Indonesia; Waseda University and the University of Tokyo, as well as such groups as the Cultural Studies Association of Australasia, and feature programmes developed by leading academics to ensure both timeliness and academic rigour.


GLOBAL2017

Conference Theme: "Global Realities: Precarious Survival and Belonging"

July 14–16, 2017 | NH Collection Barcelona Constanza, Barcelona, Spain

The theme for The Asian Conference on Cultural Studies 2014 in Osaka was “Borderlands of becoming, belonging and sharing”. In his presentation, Conference Co-Chair Professor Baden Offord wrote “Gloria Anzaldua’s idea of the borderland has become a critical conceptual rubric used by cultural researchers as a way of understanding, explaining and articulating the in-determined, vague, ambiguous nature of everyday life and the cultural politics of border-knowledge, border crossings, transgression, living in-between and multiple belongings. Borderlands is also about a social space where people of diverse backgrounds and identities meet and share a space in which the politics of co-presence and co-existence are experienced and enacted in mundane ways.”

Now, at this second IAFOR Global Studies conference, we revisit that territory under the title “Global Realities: Precarious Survival and Belonging”. While retaining the ideas expressed by Professor Offord in 2014, this conference will turn its focus on to the precariousness of life across the world, life being understood in all its amplitude. Since 2014 we have witnessed the horror of the refugee crisis in Europe and how borders which should have been crossed have been blocked off by barbed wire fences. The whole context of borders, belonging and survival has shifted resulting in an increase in racism, radical nationalisms, terrorism, infringements of human rights, and rising poverty levels, to mention only a few of the globalised problems confronting our world. The result of such precarity, even of the planet itself, has led to a generalised sense of communal and individual vulnerability.

Raimond Gaita recently noted, “It is striking how often people now speak of ‘a common humanity’ in ethically inflected registers, or ethically resonant tones that express a fellowship of all the peoples of the earth, or sometimes the hope for such a fellowship.” Hopefully, this conference will discuss the ways and means by which a “common humanity” may be aspired to by future generations.


GLOBAL2016

Conference Theme: “The Global and The Local: Crossing Sites of Cultural, Critical, & Political Intervention”

July 16–18, 2016 | NH Collection Barcelona Constanza, Barcelona, Spain

The IAFOR International Conference on Global Studies, held for the first time in 2016, brought together 88 delegates to consider some of the following questions: How have cities taken on their different shapes – residencies, commercial quarters, waves of settlement and expansion? Why have they taken on specific locations – riverside geographies, trade routes, fortification, population flows, religion, food, migration? How has their siting played into history, politics and culture?

Our conference theme for 2016, “The Global and The Local: Crossing Sites of Cultural, Critical, & Political Intervention”, generated an exciting interdisciplinary response from scholars and practitioners in the arts, humanities and (social) sciences, from artists and writers to urban planners, designers and futurists.

Keynote and Featured Speakers included renowned critic and theorist Professor Bill Ashcroft of the University of NSW, Australia, a founding exponent of post-colonial theory and co-author of The Empire Writes Back, the first text to systematically examine the field of post-colonial studies, and Alonso Carnicer, an award–winning News Reporter for TV3 in Spain, who spoke about Barcelona’s shanty towns, among others.